Key Cosmology Experiments: Original Papers-Full Text. Part 1

Andromeda Galaxy M31

Andromeda Galaxy M31

One hundred years ago this Spring, Vesto Slipher published the first article on galaxy Spectral-line Redshifts which dramatically changed cosmology.

However, few have ever read his original paper, or the several other articles and books considered cosmology landmarks of past century.

These papers are so rarely read perhaps because it takes more than a bit of effort and sometimes expense to find them. One result is that many of the papers are seriously misunderstood; particularly about which topics were and were not actually discussed, and whether they were reporting on experiments or observations or merely theorizing. To help you clarify this for yourself here are a few primary cosmology papers for your intellectual appetite and entertainment.

Redshift, Spectral Line:

The radial velocity of the Andromeda Nebula,” Slipher, Vesto (1913)

Even earlier, in 1895, a co-founder of Astrophysical Journal, James Edward Keeler, obtained redshifts for Saturn’s rings (A Spectroscopic Proof of the Meteoric Constitution of Saturn’s Rings) — essentially the first use of Doppler effect to measure astronomical object velocity.

Hubble's Original Redshift Graph

Hubble’s Original Redshift Graph

Galaxy Radial Velocity:

A Relation Between Distance and Radial Velocity Among Extra-Galactic Nebulae,” Hubble, Edwin (1929) Note how this paper does not discuss Universe Expansion. (Hubble in part, used Slipher’s high quality 1913 redshift data.)

Space Curvature:

O KPИBИ ЗHE ПPOCTPAHCTBA (On the Curvature of Space),” Friedmann, Alexander (1922) manuscript in original Russian. Analysis; not an experiment.

On the Curvature of Space,” Friedmann, Alexander Translated into English, Friedmann Archives

Universe Expansion:

Un Univers homogène de masse constante et de rayon croissant rendant compte de la vitesse radiale des nébuleuses extra-galactiques,” Lemaître, Abbe’ Georges (1927 in the original French) Analysis; this is not an experiment. It is only mathematical speculations that step into physics and drew Einstein’s retort “Your calculations are correct, but your physics are abominable.”

A homogeneous Universe of constant mass and increasing radius accounting for the radial velocity of extra-galactic nebulae,” Lemaître, Abbe’ Georges (1931, Translated by Lemaître himself.) This paper does discuss Universe Expansion. I particularly enjoy reading the last two paragraphs.

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Posted in Basic Astrophysics, Basic Science, Conjectures OverInterpreting Data, Cosmic Microwave Radiation, Dark Matter, Experiments, Models, Observations Change Ideas, Redshift, Spectral Line, Structure | 1 Comment

Cosmic Microwave Radiation Surprise

(c) Copyright 2012 David Dilworth

3 Quarks SemiFinalist 2012

This article Voted 3-Quarks Daily Semi-Finalist 2012

COBE Satellite

COBE Satellite

iPhone

iPhone-4 (Credit: Jason Hiner / TechRepublic)

What gives more detailed images (higher resolution) – an iPhone or the satellite camera used to propel Big Bang into the leading Cosmology concept?

News Flash: (June 17, 2012) This article was just voted one of the best science blog articles of the past year at 3-Quarks Daily. Thank you for your votes.

Well lets find out by trying this puzzle: See if you can figure out what fairly well-known astronomical phenomenon this is a photograph of :

COBE Astrophotography Surprise

COBE Astrophotography Surprise

Here’s a hint. This first photograph of the mystery phenomenon is presented with the same angular resolution as the camera on Cosmic Background Explorer – Differential Microwave Radiometer (COBE-DMR or COBE).

(“Angular Resolution” simply means how much detail is in an image. A camera with more megapixels has a greater angular resolution; more is better.)

The COBE satellite’s data / images were described as “echoes of Big Bang” and used to first claim cosmic microwave radiation is purely from “background,” not from stars or galaxies or space dust or gas. COBE’s “background” radiation map was used to eliminate the “ Steady-State” cosmology – Big Bang’s popular competitor at the time.

Can’t see anything? Try this sharper version of the same image with a resolution identical to the best NASA technology (WMAP) for cosmic microwave radiation.

WMAP Astrophotography Surprise

Can you guess what it is yet? or is it still too obscure?

Well, when you are ready – lets take a look at it with the resolution of an ordinary camera.

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Posted in Basic Astrophysics, Basic Science, Big Bang Models, Cosmic Microwave Radiation, Definitions, Education, Fun | 30 Comments

News: International Astronomical Union has no Definition for Big Bang

IAU has no Definition for Big Bang
(c) Copyright 2011 David Dilworth
3 Quarks Daily Semi-Finalist Logo

3 Quarks Daily Semi-Finalist Logo

“…the [Big Bang] definition is a mess.” – Prof. P. James E. Peebles, Princeton University, Feb. 2011

News: (Carmel, California) The world’s most widely respected astrophysics organization, the International Astronomical Union (or IAU), has affirmed that it has no definition for any Big Bang model.

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Posted in Basic Science, Big Bang Models, Contest, Education | 21 Comments

New Cosmology Book: “Relational Mechanics and Implementation of Mach’s Principle with Weber’s Gravitational Force”

Relational Mechanics using Mach's Principle and Weber's Gravitational Force

Relational Mechanics using Mach’s Principle and Weber’s Gravitational Force

The perpetually fascinating Andre Assis has just published a new cosmology book entitled –

Relational Mechanics and Implementation of Mach’s Principle with Weber’s Gravitational Force” by Apeiron, Montreal, 2014. (542 pages, 26 Chapters, 3 Appendices, 340 figures and 595 references.)

The book presents a comparison between Newtonian mechanics, Einstein’s special and general relativity, and relational mechanics.

Relational mechanics is a quantitative implementation of the ideas of Leibniz, Berkeley and Mach. This volume explains how to integrate those with Weber’s force law for gravitation and the principle of dynamic equilibrium.

It is a new formulation of mechanics intended to replace not only Newton’s classical mechanics, but also Einstein’s special and general theories of relativity.

The book discusses the differences between relative and absolute motion, inertial frames of reference, the distinction between the kinematic and dynamic rotations of the Earth, the principle of equivalence, and proportionality between inertial and gravitational masses.

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Dark Matter Fizzles Again

Andromeda Galaxy M31

Andromeda Galaxy M31


Dear Editor,

Reference: “Dark Matter Comes and Goes at April Meeting” – American Physical Society APS News. June 2013, Vol 22, #6, Pgs 1 & 7.

This article is a summary regarding Dark Matter at the APS April 2013 Astrophysical Conference in Denver CO. Various earlier reports regarding possible Mysterious Dark Matter detection all fizzled under scrutiny. But they will keep trying (as long as money is available).

Reference: “Gigantic IceCube Tightens Limits on Theories that Predict Dark-Matter Particles” by Schwarzchild, Physics Today, May 2013, pgs 14-16.

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Stunning Finding Supports Static Universe: 11 billion years ago we had same Ratio of Old (red) to New (blue) Galaxies

Galaxy Sample at 11 Billion Years ago

This image shows a “slice” of the Universe some 11 billion years back in time. The shape is that of the Hubble tuning fork diagram, which describes and separates galaxies according to their morphology into spiral (S), elliptical (E), and lenticular (S0) galaxies. On the left of this diagram are the ellipticals, with lenticulars in the middle, and the spirals branching out on the right side. The spirals on the bottom branch have bars cutting through their centers. The galaxies at these distances from us are small and still in the process of forming. This image is illustrative; the Hubble images used were selected based on their appearance. The individual distance to these galaxies is only approximate.
Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Kornmesser

A research team led by Bomee Lee of University of Massachusetts reported that ~11 billion years ago large galaxies had the same ratio of young (blue) to old (red) galaxies.

Galaxies can be objectively divided into two types: Young and Blue vs Old and Red. Young blue galaxies are rich in star formation, while red galaxies have little star formation. Continue reading

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The Universe’s children: Born as lively teenagers and older than their parents!

(c) Copyright 2013 Louis Marmet

The WMAP estimate of the age of the Universe, 13.77 ± 0.06 Gyr (billion years), is challenged once again by two recent publications. The study of a nearby star shows that it is older than the Universe.[1] The other study finds that starburst galaxies already existed one billion years after the Big Bang.[2] These new results add weight to the arguments that the Universe is much older than claimed by some cosmologists.

Methuselah Star (HD 140283) relative to our other neighboring stars

Methuselah Star (HD 140283) relative to our other neighboring stars. Credit: DailyGalaxy.com

The first study reports new measurements made on a star called HD 140283.[1] This “Methuselah” star, located only 190 light-years away from us, is estimated to be 14.4 ± 0.8 Gyr-old.[3][4]  The improvement in the estimate of its age results from a more accurately known distance to the star obtained from parallax measurements using the Hubble Space Telescope. The more accurate determination allows a better measurement of its absolute luminosity. Using the luminosity, the known composition of the star from spectroscopic data and temperature measurements, models of stellar formation allow a reevaluation of its age.

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Closing in on Higgs Boson Certainty, But “Standard Model Higgs” Remains Distant

A Higgs Boson? – Likely

Higgs boson trails

Higgs boson trails

“The preliminary results with the full 2012 data set are magnificent and to me it is clear that we are dealing with a Higgs boson though we still have a long way to go to know what kind of Higgs boson it is,” said CERN’s CMS Experiment Leader and spokesman Joe Incandela (a professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara) at a Particle Conference in Italia.

This is a bold step forward as, in the midst of last year’s Public Relations circus and media firestorm, Prof Incandela was brave enough to say “We don’t know if its a Higgs boson.”

However, some CERN physicists remain concerned that it is still too early to call the particle detection a “Higgs” until the evidence is totally irrefutable. This is in part due to a slight but persistent excess of gamma-gamma decays. They are not alone.
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Complex Computer Programs Weaken COBE Cosmic Microwave “Background” Claim

Rocket Explosion From Software Bug (Ariane 5)

Rocket Explosion From Software Bug (Ariane 5)


Oxymoron: “Bug-Free Software”

The $500 million dollar European satellite carrying Ariane-5 rocket blew up 37 seconds into its first launch – because of a one line software bug.

The $1.4 billion US Air Force B-2 bomber wouldn’t fly on its maiden flight — thanks to a software bug.

Later a B-2 bomber crashed and burned due to another software bug.

If debugging is taking bugs out of software – then programming must mean putting bugs in . . .” – Doug Goodall, Assembly Language Poet, 1989 (1)

This article is to let us ponder the complexity and potential flaws of computer programs used in astrophysics and cosmology.

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Posted in Basic Astrophysics, Cosmic Microwave Radiation, Education, Experiments, Models | 5 Comments

Why Don’t Three Quarks Add Up to One Proton? (and its not even close)

You’ve probably heard a thousand times that a Proton is made up of three Quarks: Two Up-Quarks and one Down-Quark. Right?

So lets just take a quick look to see how they add up.

OK – an Up Quark weighs in at 1.7 to 3.1 (MeV/c — Million Electron Volts divided by by the speed of light. That is its “rest-mass.”)

and a Down-Quark weighs in at 4.1-5.7 (MeV/c)

So two Up Quarks ~ 3.4 to 6.2 MeV/c

And One Down Quark ~ 4.1 to 5.7 MeV/c

Total ~ 7.5 to 11.9 MeV/c

Now a Proton weighs in at 938 MeV/c.

Whoa ! That doesn’t add up. This means a Proton is at least 80 times heavier that the three quarks !

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Oldest Spiral galaxy BX442 supports Hubble’s belief: Redshift does not mean expansion

(c) Copyright 2012 Louis Marmet

Q2343-BX442: A false color composite image of galaxy BX442 generated with data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the W.M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii. (Credit: David Law/Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics)

Q2343-BX442: A false color composite image of galaxy BX442 generated with data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and the W.M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii. (Credit: David Law/Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics)

A team of astronomers have reported the discovery of the oldest spiral galaxy known so far. What makes this discovery interesting is that this grand-design spiral galaxy already existed 3 billion years after the Big Bang when the universe was too hot and chaotic to allow such a regular structure to survive long enough to be seen.

Usually, galaxies born this early after the Big Bang look clumpy and irregular. When the astronomers saw the regular spiral arms of this unusual galaxy, they studied it further with the Keck Observatory in Hawai’i. The results confirmed that grand-design spiral galaxies existed at a very early age of the universe.

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Posted in Big Bang Models, Distance Measuring, Models, News, Observations Change Ideas, Redshift, Spectral Line | 6 Comments

“We don’t know if its a Higgs boson” – yet Theorists rush to claim new physics ground

“There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.” – Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi (1)

Gold Rush Prospectors

Gold Rush Prospectors

Q: What’s the difference between a religious fanatic and an extreme science “enthusiast” ?

A: I’m beginning to wonder.

Neither seems to understand that there are boundaries to science.

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Posted in Basic Science, Particles | 3 Comments

Did CERN Find a Higgs ? Well not quite. But they probably found a New Particle ! and extended their funding for years

A proton-proton collision event in the CMS experiment producing two high-energy photons (red towers). This is what we would expect to see from the decay of a Higgs boson but it is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes. © CERN 2012

A proton-proton collision event in the CMS experiment producing two high-energy photons (red towers). This is what we would expect to see from the decay of a Higgs boson but it is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes. © CERN 2012

You might have seen the New York Times Headline on July 4th “Physicists Find Elusive Particle Seen as Key to Universe”

“I think we have it”

said Rolf-Dieter Heuer, the director general of CERN.

While CERN’s spokespeople were reasonably tentative in their description (they called it “Higgs-like”), they did not exhibit as much caution as the OPERA folks did when announcing the evidence for potentially faster than light Neutrinos. This time CERN went to a lot of skillful effort to make it a media circus – and succeeded.

But did they find a Higgs particle?

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Will a Higgs Boson Discovery be Announced in July?

Higgs Signature Concept - Credit Wikipedia

Higgs Signature Concept – Credit Wikipedia

Today I ran across lots of excited rumors on Particle Physics websites that a Higgs boson might be announced at the upcoming International Conference on High Energy Physics in Australia. (The Higgs Boson is a never-observed particle that allegedly “give mass” to particles essentially creating gravity forces.)

Should you place a bet that a Higgs particle has been found ?

My answer is closer to –

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Good Fun: For Two Years an Article here Voted One of Best Science Articles of the Year

Writing Award 2011 3 Quarks DailyWriting Award 2012 3 Quarks DailyFor the second year in a row an article from this CosmologyScience.com website was voted one of the best science blog articles of the year at 3-Quarks Daily. This is thanks to friends, colleagues and you readers.

This year articles from two authors on CosmologyScience.com were nominated:

 

Observation of two early yet mature galaxies: Rare objects or is Big Bang model inaccurate?” by the brilliant Louis Marmet of Canada’s National Research Council,

Mature Galaxies - Too Far and

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CERN’s Neutrinos – Now Obeying Speed Limit

Its official – no “Faster than Light” Neutrinos at CERN.

CERN (not OPERA) Research Director Sergio Bertolucci announced yesterday at a Japanese conference that they have re-run the Neutrino experiments on four different machines and all neutrinos seem to be obeying the speed limit.

“Although this result isn’t as exciting as some would have liked,” said Bertolucci, “it is what we all expected deep down. The story captured the public imagination, and has given people the opportunity to see the scientific method in action – an unexpected result was put up for scrutiny, thoroughly investigated and resolved in part thanks to collaboration between normally competing experiments. That’s how science moves forward.”

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Posted in Basic Science, Experiments, News, Particles | 1 Comment

Dark Matter Missing in Milky Way and Nearby Galaxies – after thorough searches

You're Out  !

Dark Matter -- You're Out !

Gigantic pillars of Big Bang are creaking and starting to collapse like colossal dominoes. These are tumultuous times in Cosmology.

Recently I described how the “The voice you hear getting louder is Brünnhilde practicing Götterdämmerung” in describing the fruitless and essentially completed search for Higgs Bosons. (Update: See “Did CERN Find a Higgs ? Well not quite. But they probably found a New Particle ! and extended their funding for years“)

Well, now the hypothesis called “Dark Matter” is facing a similar fate.

What a contrast with a mere five years ago when both Dark Matter and Higgs Bosons were expected to be found rapidly.

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Posted in Big Bang Models, Dark Matter, Observations Change Ideas, Static Models | 7 Comments

Your Cosmology Hypotheses Invited

Great Ideas Invited

Great Ideas Invited

This is an invitation for you to submit your own Cosmology hypotheses for publication on this website.

You should get thoughtful responses from the several thousand readers of this website.

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Posted in Basic Science, Big Bang Models, Contest, Models, Plasma Models, Static Models, Steady-State Models | 4 Comments

Electron No Longer a Fundamental Particle ?

Spin-Charge Separation Graph

Spin-Charge Separation Graph
Credit: Nature, Schlappa et al

Amazing news: Researchers in Switzerland have separated an Electron into two smaller quasi-particles – a “Spinon” and an “Orbiton;” meaning they have physically separated the spin and the orbit properties of an Electron.

Until now, standard physics generally accepted that an Electron was a fundamental particle – that it was not made of smaller components.

However, as early as 1980 theorists had predicted an electron could be made of three smaller pieces: A “Spinon” (providing spin), an “Orbiton” (providing the orbit) and a “Holon” (carrying the charge).

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Posted in Basic Science, Particles | 12 Comments

Astronomical Image Enhancements

Astronomical Image Enhancement Engineer Brant Widgeon explaining . . .

Astronomical Image Enhancement Engineer Brant Widgeon explaining . . .

It is not always made clear that astronomical images are altered or “cleaned-up” before we see them. You know the colors of gasses and dust are “adjusted” so we can more easily see different astrophysical phenomena. You might be surprised to learn everything that goes into making the celestial beautiful.

Well, here’s an interview with an Astronomical Image Enhancement engineer, Brant Widgeon, who describes one of the lesser known phenomena that interferes with so many space photographs.

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“Perfect” Light Speed available with miniscule adjustment to the Second or the Meter Definition

LightSpeed HyperSpace

LightSpeed HyperSpace
Credit: Lucasfilm Limited

Currently the speed of light in a vacuum is just a hair under 300,000 kilometers per second (more precisely 299,792,458 kps).

In 1983, the metre was redefined in the International System of Units (SI) as the distance travelled by light in vacuum in 1⁄299,792,458 of a second.

Because the speed of light (known as “c” to mathematicians and physicists) does not exactly match 300,000 kilometers per second, it makes calculations for physicists and mathematicians unnecessarily tedious.

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Is Dark Matter “The Emperor’s New Clothes?”

Cosmology Professor Emeritus Jayant V. Narlikar

Cosmology Professor Emeritus Jayant V. Narlikar

“To claim that you have simulated the Big Bang is like a schoolboy claiming after winning a high jump medal that he is close to jumping on to the moon.”

Esteemed Cosmologist Professor Emeritus Jayant V. Narlikar reports from a Cosmology Conference on the latest developments in Dark Matter, Gravitational Waves, FTL Neutrinos, Big Bang cosmologists hugely overstating their conclusions, and a few other topics.

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Posted in Big Bang Models, Education, Events | 1 Comment

Must Faster-than Light Neutrinos Cause Cerenkov Radiation?

Cherenkov Radiation Credit: Wikipedia

Cherenkov Radiation Credit: Wikipedia

A recent criticism of the apparently Faster-than-light (FTL) Neutrinos inspiring a lot of discussion is the claim that if Neutrinos are going FTL – they must cause Cherenkov radiation.

Why? That doesn’t make sense. And its never been observed so how would anyone test that?

Cherenkov Radiation Requires Charged Particles – But Neutrinos Have No Charge

The beautiful blue-violet glow of Cherenkov Radiation is only caused by charged particles, primarily electrons.

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Observation of two early yet mature galaxies: Rare objects or is Big Bang model inaccurate?

Observation of two early yet mature galaxies: Rare objects or is Big Bang model inaccurate?
(c) Copyright 2011 Louis Marmet

News Flash: (June 12, 2012) This article was just nominated as one of the best science blog articles of the past year at 3-Quarks Daily. In voting it just missed getting in the top 20 of the 107 articles nominated; proving more popular than several Scientific American articles.

Gamma Ray Burst Through Two Extremely Distant Galaxies Credit: European Space Organization (ESO)

Gamma Ray Burst Transiting Two Extremely Distant Galaxies
Credit: European Southern Observatory (ESO)

The European Southern Observatory (ESO) recently reported a surprise while observing two extremely distant galaxies; at a very high redshift (z = 3.57); so far away that they are seen as they were a long time ago: only 1.8 billion years after Big Bang.

The surprise was to discover that the cool gas in these presumably young galaxies was very rich in heavy elements (all called metals), a chemical composition usually only seen in older galaxies because it takes so long to make heavy elements. The ESO web site reports that an international team used the flash of a distant gamma-ray burst GRB 090323 as a probe to study the spectra of the two galaxies (G0 and G1).

The bright light emitted by the burst was absorbed by the gas in both galaxies. The measured absorption spectrum allowed an evaluation of the density of heavy elements.
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Posted in Basic Astrophysics, Big Bang Models, Experiments, Static Models, Universe Age | 4 Comments

Can Dark Money Theory Explain World Economic Crisis? (spoof)

Here’s a fun article comparing the claims that 96% of the Universe (matter and energy) is missing according to Big Bang conjecture and that 96% of the world’s cash that is missing due to derivatives.
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Not Sure about Uncertainty ;-)

I’m Not Sure about the Uncertainty Principle
(c) Copyright 2011 David Dilworth

Apple Bitten:  courtesy Wikimedia

Apple Bitten: courtesy Wikimedia

It is difficult to test the flavor of an apple without biting it or taking some sample out of it. You or I can test or measure its flavor by taking a bite of it or taking a small piece for examination. Either method of testing changes the apple irreversibly. Testing that harms or changes the tested phenomena or materials is called “Destructive Testing.”

When I take a photograph inside a building, where the light is dimmer, I usually use a flash.

Using a flash intentionally affects the subject of the photograph in a demonstrable way, and in an unintended way — some people react to a strong flash of light in their eyes. A flash often changes how someone looks in a photograph.

By contrast – photography without a flash does not affect the “model,” at least not with light.

Similarly, while X-rays show us the inner workings of some things, they also harm living photography subjects by damaging the DNA of living tissue.

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